Skip to Content

I Don't Live Here Anymore

Your Debt Is Not A Moral Failure

Debt has long been the nursemaid to the American Dream. When you consider that said dream consists of little more than the ability to buy lots of pretty, shiny things and to live for years mortgaged to the hilt, it's no surprise that we've internalised the idea that debt is like, well, mother's milk: Healthy finances requires a healthy dose of it from the start, we're told. Indeed, most of us think we are incomplete without debt.

Fuck Love

November 1, 2011

By, in effect, pretending that violence is restricted to matters like rape and emotional abuse between partners of a sexual sort, or sexualised relations, as between organisers and those who work under them – the word “intimate” here certainly signifies only one kind of intimacy – [we leave] untouched and untheorised the great violence of power and silence that comes about in activist communities.

In other words, [we continue to pretend] that the only people who can fuck you up are the people you fuck.

Make Marriage Work Like Disappearing Ink: Mexico Contemplates Two-year Marital Contracts

I don't usually care about marriage news because, well, I don't generally care about marriage, period. But this recent piece from Reuters intrigued and delighted me: Mexico City lawmakers are contemplating issuing temporary marriage licenses.

According to Reuters, "Leftists in the city's assembly -- who have already riled conservatives by legalizing gay marriage -- proposed a reform to the civil code this week that would allow couples to decide on the length of their commitment, opting out of a lifetime."

Even better: "The contracts would include provisions on how children and property would be handled if the couple splits."

This is, I think, the perfect solution to the intractable and painful process that marriage often becomes for many people. Divorce in a predominantly Catholic country like Mexico is, I imagine, both culturally and economically stressful and while it may be more acceptable here, nothing makes you feel more vulnerable than the drawn out process of deciding who gets the $24.99 toaster you received as a wedding gift, or the 13-year-old kid whose onerous college fees can be seen looming in the near future.

This is a perfect solution: Make marriage work like disappearing ink. Get married, see how it works out for two years - a reasonable time period to decide who gets to take out the garbage and who gets the left side of the bed and, of course, whether or not you'd actually want to continue living with each other for much longer.

I like this. There are, of course, logistical issues to consider. [click on  "Read More" below]

Angelina Jolie, Queer Theory, and the Gods of Neoliberalism

This post was originally published on The Bilerico Project on September 21, 2007

Excerpt: "'Sybil,' it turns out, may barely have had one personality, leave alone sixteen. Much like Angelina, whose wild queerness turns out to have hidden a saintly girl who marries half the people with whom she sleeps."

 

"What Happened in Room 2806?": On Strauss-Kahn, the Maid, Power, and Our Fictions About Sex

I've been following the Dominique Strauss-Kahn story with a  mixture of bemusement, horror, and frustration, and intrigued by every turn the story has taken so far.  Last week, the New York Times reported, with more than a hint of glee, that the sexual assault case against  the former head of the International Monetary Fund was "said to be near collapse."  Why?  Because the alleged victim may have "repeatedly lied," according to even prosecutors and senior law enforcement officials who also claimed that she may have lied on her asylum application and may have "possible links to people involved in criminal activities, including drug dealing and money laundering."

The article goes on, listing all her possible infractions and lies, but it never asks the real question: Why should any of this prove that there could have been no sexual assault?  Apparently, if one follows this logic, liars and drug dealers are never raped.  Subsequently, the New York Post claimed that the hotel maid was in fact a prostitute.  The Post and five of its reporters are now being sued by the maid for defamation.

As someone who works and writes on immigration, I'm especially interested in the issue of the maid's asylum case, and I'll have more on that later.  For now, I'm intrigued by the peculiar moral framework that's slowly emerging from this case, one that demands perfect victims and evil rapists, all the while preserving larger cultural fictions about the things we call sex and love.

“Neoliberalism’s Handiest Little Tool”: Against Equality on Marriage - Interview in No More Potlucks

Ryan Conrad and I, as members of Against Equality, were interviewed by Joshua Pavan for one of our favourite publications, No More Potlucks (where I'm also a regular contributor).  Here are some excerpts:

An Interview with me and Ralowe T. Ampu for Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex

I've written a piece titled, "Queer Immigrants, the Shackles of Love, and the Invisibility of the Prison Industrial Complex," for the forthcoming anthology, Captive Genders: Trans Embodiment and the Prison Industrial Complex, due out from AK Press in August 2011.   Eric Stanley is interviewing some of the contributors for a series on the press website, and the first one features Ralowe T. Ampu and yours truly. 

A "Curvey" nomination AND an "amicable discussion about smashing capitalism in history" in Time Out Chicago!

It has been a while since I posted here, but now that the Against Equality book is published, things will start winding down and I will be posting with the same regularity. Much has been happening, and here are just a couple of highlights.

Syndicate content


about seo